Use the EconAcademics widget on your webpage or blog. See here for details.

EconAcademics.org

Blog aggregator for economics research

To bloggers

To learn how your blog can qualify to be featured on EconAcademics.org, please see the Principles section. You may already have qualified; see the current list of blogs (or those with no links yet).

Once your blog is selected for inclusion in EconAcademics.org, your blog posts will be monitored. Posts that include a link to an abstract page from a RePEc service will be included in the aggregated set of posts. The inclusion is automatic, but is monitored. Abusing this automated process can lead to suspention or deletion; see the complaints page.

In addition, we monitor links to RePEc material in other blogs with the help of Altmetric. Blogs discovered this way are included on a case by case basis.

Linking to a RePEc service abstract page instead of directly to the study not only allows your posts to appear here, it also has other advantages: First, such links are more stable, especially for working papers. Second, if the study is behind a paywall, RePEc may be able to offer alternative versions. Third, a RePEc abstract page provides also link to author profiles and similar works. Fourth, IDEAS can then also link back to the blog post through EconAcademics.org.

Past blog posts have been analyzed as far as possible, usually until about 2009. If you have older posts that could be eligible, you are welcome to send them to Christian Zimmermann. An XML format used for RSS feeds would be prefered. Also, if you were to correct past blog posts by replacing links to studies by links to RePEc abstract pages, they can be reindexed on a case-by-case basis. This also applies if you believe past posts have not been captured. The best way to do is by sending me an XML file of your posts. Here are some instructions on how to export this file for some popular blog software: Blogger/Blogspot, Typepad, Wordpress.

Note that this service is hosted at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, which also provides some fine data tools that you may find useful for your own blog. For example, you can create and link to graphs on FRED or use some of the other data or documentation sites: ALFRED, which collects vintage data (before revision); GeoFRED, which maps data; CASSIDI, which allows to look a bank merger scenarios; FRASER, historic US economic and banking documents; Page One Economics, which includes short economic essays for educators and students; and other education resources. You may also want to check out the numerous publications.

And if you want to have the FRED widget on your blog like it is here on the left side, paste this code at the appropriate place, likely a text box in you blogging platform (change height and width accordingly):

<iframe src="http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred-glance-widget.php"
scrolling="no" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #333333;
overflow:hidden; width:185px; height:485px;"
allowTransparency="true"></iframe>
If you do not like the standard set of indicators on the FRED widget, you can customize it here.

There are similar widgets for EconAcademics.org:

<iframe src="http://econacademics.org/widget.html"
scrolling="no" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #333333;
overflow:hidden; width:185px; height:485px;"
allowTransparency="true"></iframe>
You can adjust width and height for your needs, 10 entries are on the widget and some may not display depending on the size of the box. To display only posts from English-language blogs, replace widget by widget-en. Other languages can be added on demand. Wordpress.com users: unforunately, you cannot use these iframes. Wordpress.org users (those who self-host their blog) can, though, they can even use a FRED widget.

A link to EconAcademics.org from your blog is appreciated, but not required. Thanks for improving the discussion of economics research in the blogosphere.